Best James Buchanan Quotes

James Buchanan Jr. was an American lawyer, diplomat and politician who served as the 15th president of the United States from 1857 to 1861. He previously served as secretary of state from 1845 to 1849 and represented Pennsylvania in both houses of the U.S. Congress. He was an advocate for states’ rights, particularly regarding slavery, and minimized the role of the federal government preceding the Civil War. Buchanan was the last president born in the 18th century.

Here are quotes from President James Buchanan;

The distribution of patronage of the Government is by far the most disagreeable duty of the President.

Our union rests upon public opinion, and can never be cemented by the blood of its citizens shed in civil war.

Liberty must be allowed to work out its natural results; and these will, ere long, astonish the world.

American people from crossing the Rocky Mountains? You might as well command Niagara not to flow. We must fulfill our destiny.

There is nothing stable but Heaven and the Constitution.

Abstract propositions should never be discussed by a legislative body.

I feel an humble confidence that the kind Providence which inspired our fathers with wisdom to frame the most perfect form of government and union ever devised by man will not suffer it to perish until it shall have been peacefully instrumental by its example in the extension of civil and religious liberty throughout the world.

It is the imperative and indispensable duty of the Government of the United States to secure to every resident inhabitant the free and independent expression of his opinion by his vote. This sacred right of each individual must be preserved. That being accomplished, nothing can be fairer than to leave the people of a Territory free from all foreign interference to decide their own destiny for themselves, subject only to the Constitution of the United States.

I have seldom met an intelligent person whose views were not narrowed and distorted by religion.

Time is a great corrective. Political subjects which but a few years ago excited and exasperated the public mind have passed away and are now nearly forgotten.

No form of government, however admirable in itself and however productive of material benefits, can compensate for the loss of peace and domestic security around the family altar.

To avoid entangling alliances has been a maxim of our policy ever since the days of Washington, and its wisdom no one will attempt to dispute.

The ballot box is the surest arbiter of disputes among free men.

If you are as happy in entering the White House as I shall feel on returning to Wheatland, you are a happy man indeed.

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